5 Easy Ways To Add Words To Your Blog Post

Whether you’re a solo blogger working on a personal essay or a copywriter looking to bulk up your latest assignment, read on for five strategies to help you add length to your blog post.

Bloggers who want to reach the highest ranks on Google and succeed in creating content that readers can’t help but share often find themselves asking: How long should my blog posts be?

It’s a question that digital marketing analysts and content creators alike have studied and debated for years. Without enough words, readers may be left feeling dissatisfied and frustrated that all of their questions weren’t answered. Too many words, however, and you risk alienating readers who don’t have a lot of time to spare and can’t—or won’t—read to the bottom of your post.

The latest reports from sources like Yoast and HubSpot suggest that in 2020, bloggers should aim to publish posts that range from 1,000 to well over 2,000 words, depending on your content goals. It’s a fairly wide margin, and you’ll likely have to do some of your own research (or attempt some trial-and-error) to find the sweet spot for your unique audience.

If you find you do want to give your readers more content to gobble up, here are five ways to add length—and value—to your latest blog post:

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10 Questions to Ask Before Choosing A Professional Editor for Your Book

Looking for a copyeditor to help you take your project to the next level? I’ve spent the last five years helping authors and businesses optimize their content and connect with readers. Click here to learn more about my work history and get in touch.

Have you recently completed your manuscript? Gone over it yourself a time or two? Then it may be time to hire your first developmental or line editor—and once you think you’ve found the right one, it can be tempting to jump right in with both feet. But not so fast.

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A Professional Editor’s Favorite Journals and Planners — 5 Notebooks I Use Every Day

Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases, and this post contains affiliate links. If you click any of these links and make a purchase, I’ll earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. All opinions are my own and can’t be bought. Thanks so much for supporting me and my blog! (Click here for more info.)

“You don’t need to take notes,” one esteemed lecturer told me and others in the crowd ahead of a highly anticipated presentation on digital publishing. “I’ll send you a PDF of this slideshow.”

I soon found myself in a sea of side-eye when I—undeterred—took out my notebook and recorded the date in the upper right-hand corner.

My mother has accused me of being an “old soul,” and perhaps it’s just a quirk of my personality that I’m keen on pen and paper, but I’m not alone. A 2014 study from researchers at Princeton and UCLA, previously cited in a July 2017 guest post on my blog, showed that taking notes by hand helps with retention in the classroom—largely, they say, because the physical note-taking process forces the listener to actively synthesize, process, and reframe the information being presented.

“The more deeply information is processed during note taking, the greater the encoding benefits,” researchers Pam A. Mueller and Daniel M. Oppenheimer reported.

If you’re like me, and the majority of the participants in Mueller and Oppenheimer’s study, then taking notes helps you better understand and recall new information—and you’re going to want the right tools for the job. As a freelance writer and editor, here are my five favorite notebooks, journals, and planners—the ones I use on a daily basis and simply can’t live without:

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The Simple Way to Boost Traffic to Your Author Website: A Blog!

Hey there, writer! Looking for a copyeditor to help you take your project to the next level? I’ve spent the last five years helping authors and businesses optimize their content and connect with readers. Click here to learn more and get in touch.

We all know that whether you’re traditionally published or going D.I.Y., marketing your book is mostly on you, the author—and creating a solid web presence is one of the best ways to do just that. But how can you make the most of your online persona?

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5 Ways to Boost Your Creativity and Beat Writer’s Block

This year has flown by—can you believe it’s already October?—and as we approach the holidays, many writers will soon find themselves struggling to keep up their regular workflows. Between all the gift-giving, meal cooking, and school–holiday–concert attending, it can be hard to find time to be creative. But you don’t need to let yourself fall into a creative slump.

If you’re feeling out of your element this fall, don’t beat yourself up: you’re not alone. You just have to put in some extra effort to get those creative juices flowing!

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Book Review: “On Writing” by Stephen King

Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases, and this post contains affiliate links. If you click any of these links and make a purchase, I’ll earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. All opinions are my own and can’t be bought. Thanks so much for supporting me and my blog! (Click here for more info.)

A book so revered by authors worldwide couldn’t possibly be sub-par, could it?

Actually, it could. And this one…sort of is.

Here’s why.

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft was published in 2000, but its old age doesn’t make it any less popular among aspiring authors, many of whom seem to worship King like a diety. While I don’t share this passion for King and his horror, I can appreciate a good writing when I find one — and that’s what I was hoping for with this book. (Spoiler alert: I wasn’t disappointed, at least in that regard.)

I actually had very specific expectations going into this work. King has repeatedly emphasized that while this book includes a narrative-style overview of his unarguably successful writing process, it is more autobiographical than it is a reference guide. As such, it is divided into two major parts: the former discusses his journey from youth to adulthood, including what made him interested in stories and how he got started in the industry amid familial turmoil; the latter focuses specifically on his candid tips for aspiring authors.

As I’m not a huge fan of King’s works overall, I didn’t expect that the first part of the book would interest me much. But I soon found myself captivated by his writing style. If nothing else, the first half of this book was thoroughly entertaining, and I could barely put it down.

Even before I got to Page 1, however, I expected that the latter half would be my favorite — so after reading such an amazing memoir section, I couldn’t wait to get to the writing guide. But once I got there, I felt sort of let down.

I’d heard from a colleague (an Atlanta-based author who I met during my 2016 trip to the College Media Association conference that year) that On Writing gets a bit slow in the middle, so I was ready to power through it. But while it did pick up the pace a bit eventually, the second half of the book never really lived up to its predecessor.

The writing tips were cliché at best — and nothing I’d never heard before. Perhaps this is because I read this book almost two decades after its release, but you’d think that with King’s immense success, he’d have a unique outlook on the craft of writing. But I didn’t really feel that was the case.

Instead, I got the same old tips that authors tell each other all day, every day: avoid adverbs, write the story you’re “meant to tell,” and follow your instincts.

That’s not tangible advice. At best, it’s motivating, especially if you know that you already don’t use adverbs or you’re a “pantser,” much like King. At worst, you glean nothing from it. Which is what I got.

While I understand that the book is more of a memoir for King than a writing guide, it would also be nice to see an improved structure in this work. The numbered sections all sort of ran together, and there wasn’t a sensible progression between them. Additionally, it would be very difficult, without diligent annotations, to return to the book and find King’s specific advice about a certain topic: there is no table of contents, or even labeled headers.

To me, a sensible structure should have been a priority for a book of this nature. Why wasn’t it?

Still, I did enjoy King’s reproach of scientific methods for writing books, and his emphasis on imagination and creativity. Too many writers (myself included, oftentimes) assume that good writing is all about the craft of outlining, sentence structure, and cohesiveness. But creativity is one of the most important traits a writer can possess, and King candidly recognizes this.

But even still, that’s nothing new.

I guess I wanted to read something groundbreaking, and this fell short. A fault of overly-high expectations? Perhaps. But I can’t shake the feeling.

In short, if you’re a Stephen King fan, you’ll love this book. It will confirm your likely beliefs about the writing process and give you a glimpse into the life of an author you admire — which is nothing to look down upon. However, if you’re an aspiring author who’s just looking for writing or publishing advice, there are many more (better) books on writing that I could recommend instead.

What are your thoughts on Stephen King’s writing? Share with me in the comments below!

I paid for my own copy of this book with my own money.

This article was published Jan. 25, 2018.

3 Things You Need in Your Query Letter to a Literary Agent

If you’re in the process of getting your book traditionally published, odds are you’ve been looking for an agent to help you get your manuscript out to the world—and if you’ve done any research on the matter, you’ll know that a solid query letter is key to landing a good literary agent.

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The #1 Reason People Aren’t Reading Your Writing (+ How to Fix it!)

So you’re having trouble getting people to read what you’ve written? Bummer.

But unless you’re writing the next Harry Potter novel, getting your book in the hands of readers is always going to be an uphill battle. Not only do you have to get people to want to read your books, though; you also have to make people be willing to pay money for them. And that’s a challenging feat.

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